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Ford's 4.6L TEKSID and WAP blocks

ModFoxMustangs

Well-Known Member
Staff member
TEKSID and WAP Cylinder Block

Choosing the appropriate 4.6-liter block for a race or performance application is not too challenging of a proposition. We at Sean Hyland Motorsport (SHM) have successfully used the ‘96-‘98 Cobra aluminum block as a basis for drag-race engines of up to 1500 hp. This block, part number F6LZ-6010-AB, was also used in the ‘93-‘98 Lincoln Mark 8. Originally this block was cast in Italy by Teksid, a supplier to Ferrari and other manufacturers. The block is cast in SAE 319 modified alloy aluminum before it is heat treated and aged to achieve the desired characteristics. Overall, we have achieved good results with this lightweight (85.40 lbs) alloy block, as long we use care in its preparation. In 1999, Ford changed the main cap detail, eliminating the jackscrews that preloaded the side of the main cap. They also changed the width of the cap, and switched to a different side bolt with a higher torque value. The diameter of the hole for the knock sensor was also changed from M8x1.25 to M12x1.50. We simply drill and tap these holes if we are using the ’99-up block in an earlier chassis.

The part number for the ‘99 block is XR3Z-6010-CA.

In 2001, Ford changed the design of the block to a lighter-weight (80.40 lbs) casting utilizing SAE319 modified alloy, incorporating some interesting design changes. This block is known as the WAP (Windsor Aluminum Plant) block. The oil drain-back holes were changed to keep the oil as far away from the crank as possible, and the main bearing web area was changed to create a beefier structure.

The Teksid block below was cast in Italy from 1993 to 1999.

TEKSID BLOCK


WAP BLOCK
wap.jpg

The WAP block above has been cast at Windsor Aluminum Plant since 2001.

The WAP block
shows the extensive ribbing that was added to compensate for a thinner case section. The WAP block is 5 lbs lighter than the Teksid block on the right. The Teksid block is the strongest production aluminum case available.

Extra external ribbing detail also contributes to a beefier appearance, although the lighter weight means that the extra ribbing has been added to compensate for a reduction of section thickness in the case. The NVH (noise, vibration, harshness) block is a derivative of the WAP block, but features
a thicker pan rail for decreased noise. This seems to be the current block in production on the Marauder. At this time, we have not used the later block for any extreme horsepower applications, and some attempts by others have resulted in block failure. Our recommendation is that the early block is the best foundation for power levels above 900 hp, although the later block certainly should be adequate for moderate power levels of up to 600 hp.
 

Bill

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Donator
This is a perfect picture comparison of the two blocks if you are trying to figure out where the hole has to be drilled to mount 2V heads on the Teksid block. If you look at the WAP block, there are three holes on the drivers side front top cylinder bank. On the Teksid, there are only 2. The passage is under there, just no hole. That is where you will drill the 9/16" hole...and the part that tends to scare people.
 

ModFoxMustangs

Well-Known Member
Staff member
This is a perfect picture comparison of the two blocks if you are trying to figure out where the hole has to be drilled to mount 2V heads on the Teksid block. If you look at the WAP block, there are three holes on the drivers side front top cylinder bank. On the Teksid, there are only 2. The passage is under there, just no hole. That is where you will drill the 9/16" hole...and the part that tends to scare people.
Can you grab that picture and Photoshop the illustration you are referring too?
 

Bill

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Donator
Here you go. I would also recommend that you buy the cheapest driver's side head gasket you can get. This will allow you to use it as a guide for the drill and for gasket matching without worrying about damaging your high end gasket. Think of it as a poor man's jig. Some brands of high end gasket are slightly smaller than 9/16" (read metric). Make sure you choose an appropriate size bit for the gasket you plan to use. (I guess I need to add that to the instruction file don't I)

Teksid WAP where to dril the hole.JPG
 

Memphis Modular

Active Member
FYI the updated wap block 05+ 3v engines, is stronger than the teksid was. With some simple prep an old style wap block can handle much more than 600 hp. Mostly just deburring the edges and some other little tricks/workings on the main webbing area
 

Bill

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Donator
Do you have a link for newer block build? I've seen several Teksids north of 2200 at the flywheel. I've never seen anything out of the Windsor Aluminum Plant survive for long above 1000. I know it is possible to put 2 valve heads on the newer WAP blocks, but I haven't seen anyone do it and make big power.
 

Bill

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Donator
No doubt. That little mod spooks a lot of folks, but is really easy. Buy a cheap head gasket and us it as a guide. Let me know if you have any questions about the water passage. It has been years since I wrote the tech, but I might still be able to remember.
 

hipoman

Active Member
Thanks. I'm not too spooked i'm just trying to get all the info i can. I built a 1972 datsun 521 pick up overhead cam motor a long time ago & the guy who bought it drve it to texas. I've also built big and small ford and chevy's. The special tools i need and build specs with the mods i'm doing are the ?s
 

Rudy Diaz

New Member
I need to know where I can go to get layouts of a 4.6L WAP. I am putting together my WAP block with stock crank. I a really interested in seeing
how many bolts are used on the mains. I see it has 4 per main. I need to see if I need to purchase more bolts.

Thanks,
 

Rudy Diaz

New Member
What I really need to know is how the main caps are being bolted on. It looks like it takes the standard size plus a smaller size bolt.
Is there a website I can go to just see if the bolts I have needed or not.
 

Bill

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Donator
sorry Rudy, I'm not aware of any. One of the SVT websites might have the data buried somewhere, but I'm not sure where. I remember the SHM book having pictures of the main caps, but I don't have it in front of me. A stop by the Ford dealer's parts counter should be able to get you what you need in terms of information. They will have that data.
 

92dohcfox

Active Member
this article is somewhat misleading. I talked to modular motorsports racing, they have used 01 style wap blocks in 1500+hp builds , and they have lived for years under heavy drag only use with stock cranks.
 

Bill

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Donator
this article is somewhat misleading. I talked to modular motorsports racing, they have used 01 style wap blocks in 1500+hp builds , and they have lived for years under heavy drag only use with stock cranks.
I would certainly be interested in seeing the prep tech and parts list on a WAP block that has taken 1500+ under heavy use for years.
 

92dohcfox

Active Member
I would certainly be interested in seeing the prep tech and parts list on a WAP block that has taken 1500+ under heavy use for years.
I'm sure it's not cheap at that power level, but many have done 1000 hp or so on wap blocks for years. I'm using mine for a high horsepower build and won't think twice about it.
 
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