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Teksid 2V Tech Article (Must Read)

Bill

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Donator
Those springs are beefy and the rods are absolutely beautiful. You will love the MM front end. We were a MM dealer/installer for years and swear by them. It will give you steering geometry control that is hard to beat and is durable enough for daily driver use. If you haven't looked at chassis stiffening products yet, Brian Figg at Stifflers makes about the best subframe triangulation system on the market. Even if you already have subframe connectors, his stuff can be adapted to almost any brand connector.
 

Kmax

Member
The MM front end is excellent. It was a bit of a bear to install (first time for me, big 3-day learning curve) but it definitely raised the handling and "feel" a few notches. I installed MM subframe connectors later and noticed the difference in ride immediately... more solid, likely a combination of stiffening the chassis and anchoring the seats more securely. I'll have a look at the Stifflers site, thanks for the tip. Here's the bottom of the front end after i got the final tweaking done.
Sorry i kinda drifted off the Teksid thread, back to that in a couple days. I just found out that the "lightly used" Fidanza aluminum flywheel i acquired is not salvageable, so i'm going with a McLeod Chromoly flywheel to match the McLeod "Street Pro" clutch i have for this build. If anybody thinks that's a bad choice (i've done some research that suggests a really lightweight flywheel might not be a good thing for a daily driver), let me know. ...regards, kevin
 

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Kmax

Member
January 6 update... no, not about politics! I haven't been able to find a F3AE-6C086-AE ('94-'95 Tbird) timing cover, so i bought a 2W7E-6C086-AC (for a 2004 Mustang) cover and test-fitted it to the Teksid block... it fits perfectly. Since i'm using Romeo heads, the bolt holes should match up. Here's a photo of the timing cover fitted to the block (sorry, it's still wrapped in plastic). The belt tensioner was included with the cover.
Bill, do you recall what modifications you had to make when you had to substitute a different timing cover for the Tbird timing cover?
...regards, kevin
 

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Bill

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Donator
January 6 update... no, not about politics! I haven't been able to find a F3AE-6C086-AE ('94-'95 Tbird) timing cover, so i bought a 2W7E-6C086-AC (for a 2004 Mustang) cover and test-fitted it to the Teksid block... it fits perfectly. Since i'm using Romeo heads, the bolt holes should match up. Here's a photo of the timing cover fitted to the block (sorry, it's still wrapped in plastic). The belt tensioner was included with the cover.
Bill, do you recall what modifications you had to make when you had to substitute a different timing cover for the Tbird timing cover?
...regards, kevin
The only problems I've seen are when the holes didn't match up properly. As I recall, all I did was fill them to create a seal.
 

Joe Jr.

New Member
Found this thread that Bill started last night. Can't believe this goes back to 2012 when he started it. anyways was considering a teksid motor build also with my fox lake windsor heads and found this. Great information!
 

Bill

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Donator
Hi Joe. Welcome to the party. Dig in and make yourself at home. You'll find a lot of builders here that have a great deal of experience and information offered up. If you decide to do the build, please do a build thread so that others can learn from your experiences. There are always little nuances that don't make it into a tech article that help others. Pictures are nice also :)
 

Kmax

Member
Unfortunately, my project has slowed down while waiting for parts :rolleyes: I didn't get a picture of balancing the crank, but here's a picture of it after balancing (yes, it was balanced with the flywheel and clutch attached). It was pretty close, but did need some shaving and drilling. The pistons and rods are also weight-matched. I've always been a bit nervous when getting close to redline! This is the '99 Cobra crank, note the nice forged colour.
...regards, kevin
 

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Kmax

Member
I had a couple dyno pulls done a week ago, just to get a baseline for this project. The engine in the car has 270,xxx KM on it, runs well, burns no oil. The intake manifold has developed a small coolant leak over the past few months which has motivated me to get this done. Here's the dyno result.
...regards, kevin
 

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Kmax

Member
February 19 update... the rotating assembly is installed. No issues, but those little %$#& C-clips that retain the wrist pins are evil. Since this build is a collection of parts from many sources, i don't have access to some of the fasteners. Bill, or anybody else, do you know what types of bolts are used (looks like they're "shoulder bolts") to install the timing chain guides? I bought a Trick Flow timing kit, but it didn't include fasteners....
I've read that a stroker kit makes the pistons extend a bit too far out of the cylinders, note how much skirt is exposed at stock BDC! Here's what it looks like today. ...regards, kevin
 

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Bill

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Donator
February 19 update... the rotating assembly is installed. No issues, but those little %$#& C-clips that retain the wrist pins are evil. Since this build is a collection of parts from many sources, i don't have access to some of the fasteners. Bill, or anybody else, do you know what types of bolts are used (looks like they're "shoulder bolts") to install the timing chain guides? I bought a Trick Flow timing kit, but it didn't include fasteners....
I've read that a stroker kit makes the pistons extend a bit too far out of the cylinders, note how much skirt is exposed at stock BDC! Here's what it looks like today. ...regards, kevin
I apologize that it took me so long to get back to you. I hope you already have your answer. I did check the timing sets I have on the shelf and none have the bolts with them. So, short of pulling a timing cover, I don't have a good answer yet.
 

Kmax

Member
It seems that i was going down another rabbit hole with the timing guide fasteners :rolleyes: I did have to get some different size bolts, but not the exotic "shoulder bolts" i was convinced i needed. Fortunately, Ford only uses a few different size bolts, and it seems that Hex M6-1.0 and M8-1.25 (various lengths) are the most common. I appreciate you checking for me, Bill. It sounds like you're still in the saddle, i had the impression that you had retired. Your customers appreciate you!
Here's a little bit of "clearancing" i had to do on the left side of the block in order to use the Trick Flow fixed guide. Interestingly, there are 2 sets of fixed guides in the Trick Flow kit; one is all plastic with 2 mounting holes, and the other is steel-backed with plastic guide surface and 3 mounting holes. I used the steel-backed ones after filing down a casting ridge (note the black sharpie mark on the block) to get the left one to fit flush to the mounting bosses. I'll have some more photos tomorrow.
...regards, kevin
 

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Bill

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Donator
It seems that i was going down another rabbit hole with the timing guide fasteners :rolleyes: I did have to get some different size bolts, but not the exotic "shoulder bolts" i was convinced i needed. Fortunately, Ford only uses a few different size bolts, and it seems that Hex M6-1.0 and M8-1.25 (various lengths) are the most common. I appreciate you checking for me, Bill. It sounds like you're still in the saddle, i had the impression that you had retired. Your customers appreciate you!
Here's a little bit of "clearancing" i had to do on the left side of the block in order to use the Trick Flow fixed guide. Interestingly, there are 2 sets of fixed guides in the Trick Flow kit; one is all plastic with 2 mounting holes, and the other is steel-backed with plastic guide surface and 3 mounting holes. I used the steel-backed ones after filing down a casting ridge (note the black sharpie mark on the block) to get the left one to fit flush to the mounting bosses. I'll have some more photos tomorrow.
...regards, kevin
Hi Kevin,
I am retired from making my living turning wrenches. It is just an expensive hobby now. When the economy failed in 2008, I got in a pretty deep hole and eventually landed a government job. I do still have five Mustangs ranging from 86 to 2004. The one that is apart at the moment is a 97 black GT convertible with black top and black leather interior. I'm putting at 04 engine in it as a father's day gift for my father-in-law. His wife won't let him buy a Mustang, since he wrecked the last one (he's 81), but she can't keep me from giving him one.
 

Kmax

Member
Agreed, it is an expensive hobby! Could be worse though, like racehorses, yachts, airplanes... It's sad to hear that you were a victim in 2008. Amazing that nobody in that sub-prime debt scam went to jail for causing such chaos.
Five Mustangs! Have they all been project cars? At least you have a driver while you're working on another one... I'm running out of winter and want to get this horse back running soon!
You're a pretty good son-in-law! I can't imagine that either of my children's spouses would build me a Mustang... so no crashes! Very nice Fathers' day present...
I didn't get anywhere with the engine yesterday, couldn't find washers for the balancer and cam gears, so i had to ask a friend with a lathe to make some. The usual one step forward...
Here's a picture of the horse the 2v Teksid engine will be going into, taken a few months ago.
...regards, kevin
 

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Bill

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Donator
That's a beautiful machine. Of my five, 3 are perpetual project cars with always something needing done. The one of my Father-in-law is the second one I have put together for him. I built a 85 convertible for him in 2005. He loaned it to my nephew who totaled it. The 97 will not get the paint job and detail work that one did.
 

Kmax

Member
Again, you're a fine son-in-law. And a better Uncle than i ever want to be! I'll bet the end of the '85 created an interesting family situation...
The Teksid build continues at it's customary torrid pace. Good things come to those who wait... i hope. Here are a couple photos from yesterday. ...regards, kevin
 

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Kmax

Member
Bill, you mentioned installing an oil cooler in your article. Did you fab them yourself, or go with an aftermarket setup? Is reduced oil flow through a cooler a consideration? I have installed a Cobra oil pump, so it delivers more pressure, will this be enough to overcome the extra flow restriction? MMR makes a nice setup (although, at this point a few extra bucks shouldn't even be worth thinking about :rolleyes:). ...regards, kevin

ps. here's the MMR link: Ford Modular MMR TraX Pack Oil Cooler kit 4.6 Mustang GT / COBRA [439159] - $499.99 : Modular Motorsports, Home of the worlds fastest Fords (modularmotorsportsracing.com)
 

Bill

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Donator
that MMR piece is nice looking. The Cobra oil pump will support the added demands of the larger cooler. The last one I did, I actually used an aluminum transmission cooler from an F550. I found it in a salvage yard and was impressed with the way it was made. It was an easy fab up. I mounted it between the AC condenser and the radiator. I used Steeda Ultracool radiator and a Ford Taurus 2-speed fan. Worked like a champ, even in summer desert heat on a long trip.
 
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