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Teksid 2V Tech Article (Must Read)

Bill

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Donator
Today i got the new Manley valves installed in the heads. They fit, and with a minimal grind on the valves, they sit nice and deep in the seats. I checked the intake valves clearance to the deck of the heads with my piece of aluminum flat bar, and it looks like about .105". With the factory valves, the clearance measured about .068"... so i've picked up .037"! Going back to my measurements from a previous post where i found .028" PTV clearance on the intake valves at 8 degrees ATDC, i'm hoping that measurement will now be about .065", which would be within spec.
Since the block and heads have been sitting (even though covered in plastic) for a couple months, i'm going to remove, clean and oil the pistons and bores tomorrow before i reassemble and degree the cams... hopefully for the final time!
Here are a couple photos of the new valves installed, and the intake valve to head deck clearance (valve droop).
Fingers crossed, eyes crossed... ...regards, kevin
Sweet. I like the plug index. Very nice detail that is often overlooked.
 

Kmax

Active Member
I'd love to take credit for the plug index, but the truth is Ford made me look good :cool:.
I've been (slowly) taking out the pistons and cleaning/oiling them and the cylinders. As i noted
before, this project has been sitting for a couple months while waiting for valves, so i wanted to
make sure i get rid of the dust and spiders (ok, slight exaggeration) before i close it up. When
i took apart the rods/caps, i noticed a hint of scoring on #7 rod bearings. It's not deep, in fact
i can barely notice it when i run a fingernail across it, but still... Here are a couple photos of the
bearings and one of the rod journal on the crank. The oil feed hole has been roughly countersunk a bit,
and it looks like there might be a tiny burr on it, causing the bearing marks? Is this serious? Should
i take a chance on using emery cloth or a fine file (with the shop vac right there) on the edge of
the oil hole, or would this be foolish?
More bad $#%*! language in the shop today... ...regards, kevin

ps. these are new bearings, and the scoring is from me turning the crank by hand while trying to
degree the cams a couple months ago. ARP cap fasteners, torqued to 45 ft/lbs.
 

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Bill

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Donator
Given what you have planned and the amount of time and money you have invested, you absolutely want to clean that burr up. It doesn't appear the bearing is damaged through the beak-in coat, but hard to tell through the photos. Just be sure that you are careful and use an appropriately very fine abrasive. I tend to use a Dremel on things like that. The shop vac will help, but be sure to wipe it down with a lent free oil cloth to ensure you pick up all the tiny pieces of debris. There are a lot of techniques out there to isolate and clean stuff like that. Some of it is science and some is more art. Everyone has their preferred methods based on how they learned (including me).
 

Kmax

Active Member
This is one of those low points in a project. I took the bearings to the shop that did the machine work and the owner said it should be fine. I sure don't like the look of the oil hole, but he said the journal has been polished and that shallow scoring on the bearings is just cosmetic. As i mentioned, i can barely feel it with a fingernail... Looks like a potential hot spot to me, but i'm certainly no expert. Gawd, i'd hate it if that bearing spins or burns!
Are the bevelled edges of the oil holes in the journals usually smoothed out after chamfering them and before polishing? The more i learn about this project, the more i realise i have a lot to learn. ...regards, kevin
 

massacre

Active Member
Donator
This is one of those low points in a project. I took the bearings to the shop that did the machine work and the owner said it should be fine. I sure don't like the look of the oil hole, but he said the journal has been polished and that shallow scoring on the bearings is just cosmetic. As i mentioned, i can barely feel it with a fingernail... Looks like a potential hot spot to me, but i'm certainly no expert. Gawd, i'd hate it if that bearing spins or burns!
Are the bevelled edges of the oil holes in the journals usually smoothed out after chamfering them and before polishing? The more i learn about this project, the more i realise i have a lot to learn. ...regards, kevin
If it were me, i would ask them if they would back up their claim by guaranteeing their work if the bearing does fail down the road. Put their money where their mouth is, so to speak.
 

Bill

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Donator
"Are the beveled edges of the oil holes in the journals usually smoothed out after chamfering them and before polishing?"

My machine guy always beveled edges and completed all other machine work before polishing, so that the final polish and clean was what the customer (me) received. I don't remember an oil bevel looking rough like that. If it truly is cosmetic, the small scoring will just hold oil. If not... I can't honestly say without putting hands on it, but I would think it would be easy to clean up. Can you feel the burr on the journal? You could run a piece of cheap pantyhose across it to see if it snags. It is a bit old school, but it worked in the 70's.

One of my issues is that the striations all run on the same axis, which tells me he used a grinding disc type tool to create the bevel instead of a high speed rotary tool. That would really not be my preference, as it creates unnecessary inconsistencies in the work.
 
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Kmax

Active Member
I agree, the chamfer is messy. I went back to the shop again today to look at other cranks for comparison. The owner reassured me again that there's no fatal flaw, but he did look closely at the bearings before saying so. I ran a strip of paper across the oil hole, and nothing snagged. I also had a real close look and feel at that journal. If i was the one doing that chamfer, i would've gone full OCD on it, but i tend to be meticulous to a fault sometimes :rolleyes: So, today i torqued all the rod caps (with lots of assembly lube on the bearing surfaces, and clean and dry on the back of the bearings), cleaned the pistons and cylinders and oiled them, and installed the windage tray. For the record, i used ARP moly lube on the cap fasteners and torqued them gradually to 45 foot pounds. The windage tray fasteners (ARP) i used threadlock and torqued them to 32 foot pounds. I had to McGuyver the oil pickup tube anchor to clear the windage tray and sit deep in the pan. Finally, i put the head gaskets on (correctly this time) and set the heads in place. Tomorrow i'll find out if the new valves will give me the clearance i need.
I appreciate your input, Bill. I'm not real happy with the crank machining, but the machinist says it's fine. If rod #7 has issues, he's going to make it right.
You learn something every day, whether you want to or not. ...regards, kevin
 

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Bill

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Donator
The pickup tube adapter looks nice. It looks like the one that came on some mid-90s Ford F150s. I have used similar pieces, particularly for deeper sump or asymmetric (non-centered) sump applications.
 
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